Advanced Engineering Apprenticeships



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Do you sit in class, daydreaming about a career in engineering? Advanced engineering apprenticeships are a pathway to making those dreams become a reality. If you want to be an engineer, and don’t want to take the route of university, an advanced engineering apprenticeship might just be the perfect option for you. Here is our guide to advanced engineering apprenticeships.
What is an advanced apprenticeship? Am I eligible to apply? Where can I apply? If these questions have been keeping you up at night, read our overview of advanced apprenticeships. It will answer every question you have… about advanced apprenticeships.

Advanced engineering apprenticeships: what are they?

Advanced engineering apprenticeships are a combination of working in industry, and studying towards qualifications. You will develop practical work skills while you work for an engineering company, and gain qualifications through a college or training provider. These schemes are especially relevant if you do not wish to attend university. Advanced engineering apprenticeships are a blend of practical and theoretical learning. As a result, you will complete the scheme with nationally certified qualifications, and great work experience.  In addition, you will be paid a wage for the duration of the apprenticeship. What’s not to love?
For a detailed breakdown of the engineering industry, and the different schemes that are available to you, check out our guide, Engineering: Apprenticeships, Work Experience and School Leaver Programmes.

How do advanced engineering apprenticeships work?

Advanced engineering apprentices split their time between the workplace, and a training centre/college. These schemes can be structured differently from company to company. You might spend four days working with your employer, and one day a week at college. Or you could be working with your employer for weeks at a time, and then have block releases to study at college. These schemes can last anywhere between 18 and 24 months. If you complete an advanced apprenticeship in engineering, you will gain a National Vocational Qualification (Level 3), Key Skills and a knowledge based certificate, such as a BTEC. This is the equivalent of two A-levels. The entry requirements for an advanced engineering apprenticeship will depend on the employer. However, most employers featured on RateMyApprenticeship looks for students who have at least 5 GCSEs (A*-C), or have completed an intermediate apprenticeship. If you haven’t yet looked at our vacancies for advanced apprenticeships, click here and disappear to our jobs page.

Here is a short video, revealing the day-to-day activities of advanced engineering apprentices at EDF Energy.


The best advanced engineering apprenticeships?

There are advanced engineering apprenticeships on offer in a wide-range of engineering disciplines, from companies across the UK. More and more school leaver’s are choosing the apprenticeship path to start a career in engineering. Over 188,000 school leaver’s started advanced apprenticeships last year alone! Given that there is such a variety of schemes on offer, how do you find the best engineering apprenticeships? Or, better put, how do you find the advanced apprenticeship in engineering that is right for you? RateMyApprenticeship has more than 2,500 reviews of advanced apprenticeships. The reviews are written by the apprentices themselves, and offer an insight into what it is like to be advanced apprentice. Each reviewer provides information about course content, course structure, salary and the opportunities available to them outside of work. Furthermore, every apprentice offers their opinion on how the company they worked for supported them. These reviews can offer you valuable information about different schemes and the various engineering companies that run them. It is through the past experiences of your peers, that you can find the advanced apprenticeship that is right for you. If you click here, you will be transported to our review page. Get clicking!

Should I do an advanced engineering apprenticeship?

An advanced apprenticeship in engineering is a marvellous option for any school leaver with an interest in engineering. Here are the some of the most noteworthy benefits of applying for an advanced apprenticeship in engineering…
  • First of all, advanced engineering apprenticeships combine practical and theoretical study. Therefore you will qualify with a wide understanding of the engineering discipline you have studied. Advanced apprentices are, as a result, highly employable candidates.
  • In addition to this, all apprentices earn a wage for the duration of the scheme. In other words, an advanced apprenticeship is a full-time job. You will spend the majority of your time working for an engineering company, being trained through practical work. If you are no longer interested in full-time education when you leave school, an advanced apprenticeship is an option you should definitely consider.
  • Advanced engineering apprentices also qualify with a fantastic qualification, without any debt. The average university student graduates with a debt of over £44,000 (Institute for Fiscal Studies). An apprenticeship is an opportunity to gain career-defining qualifications, without being saddled with maintenance loans and fees to repay.
  • Advanced apprentices have the opportunity to learn from, and work with senior engineers. These experienced professionals could be useful contacts in your future career, as well as being great for your training.
  • Advanced engineering apprenticeships can lead onto further education; a higher apprenticeship, and even a degree!

An advanced engineering apprenticeship could be your first step on a path to a career in engineering. Take your first steps now, and check out RateMyApprenticeship’s vacancies for advanced apprenticeships. View jobs → For more advice on engineering careers and job opportunities sent straight to your inbox, sign up with RateMyApprenticeship. It’s free! Register here →
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